It’s the Summer of BEES!

Have you heard, It’s the SUMMER of BEES?! Share your photos with us using #summerofbees on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.   Summer is the perfect time to celebrate bees and the work they do for the ecology of our beautiful planet. In North Devon the hedgerows, trees and fields are buzzing with life in the summer months. We want people to take the time to appreciate bees and learn more about their fascinating lives and at the same time we want to support scientific research projects aimed at helping bees and also we want to help beekeepers in poorer parts of the world. Seeds for bees will be available to buy at Quince Honey Farm this summer and all proceeds will go towards scientific research and Bees Abroad, a charity relieving poverty through beekeeping. We hope you will join us this summer at Quince Honey Farm where we are running a jam packed day of bee related activities every day suitable for children and adults.      ...

It’s the summer of BEES!

Summer is the perfect time to celebrate bees and the work they do for the ecology of our beautiful planet. In North Devon the hedgerows, trees and fields are buzzing with life in the summer months.   We want people to take the time to appreciate bees and learn more about their fascinating lives and at the same time we want to support scientific research projects aimed at helping bees and also we want to help beekeepers in poorer parts of the world. Seeds for bees will be available to buy at Quince Honey Farm this summer and all proceeds will go towards scientific research and Bees Abroad, a charity relieving poverty through beekeeping.     We hope you will join us this summer at Quince Honey Farm where we are running a jam packed day of bee related activities every day suitable for children and adults.  ...

Get kids out learning this summer!

Get kids out learning at Quince honey Farm this summer!  Have fun and learn all about the fascinating world of the Honeybee. Nowhere else can you get so close to honeybees without needing protective clothing – will you be able to spot a queen bee? Plus, with experienced beekeepers on hand giving guided tours, you’ll be surprised just how many strange and interesting facts there are to learn about these fascinating insects. We offer a day full of activities which are provided by our friendly and knowledgeable education team. Ranging from our hands-on Critter Encounters bug shows to our engaging daily talks and candle rolling, there’s always something happening to make your visit all the more memorable. For those budding young beekeepers, we also run daily beekeeping demonstrations, as well as our Be a Beekeeper Experience; allowing visitors of all ages to get suited-up and try their hands at a spot of beekeeping. Take a guided tour of the factory floor and see how the honey gets from the hive to the jar. You’ll also have plenty of opportunities to try our produce at the honey tasting sessions. There is a hive of activity for everyone!   Check out https://tutora.co.uk/get-kids-out-learning...

Be a beekeeper activity at Quince Honey Farm

Today Quince Honey Farm welcomed newest member Jason Parker to the team. He dived straight in this afternoon with our Bee a Beekeeper Experience. “Day one in my new role a Quince Honey Farm and, after a friendly welcome from colleagues, I spent the afternoon with the public delving into the fascinating world of the honey bee. We were given a guided tour of the facilities along with an in-depth talk on how Quince Honey Farm create their delicious honey products: which me and the rest of the group corroborated during the ever-popular tasting session! The highlight for me though was definitely getting suited up and joining beekeeper Alex as we ventured out to meet the hive face to face. Whilst the experience of holding a beeswax frame containing over seven hundred honey bees on it is a little nerve-racking, it is something I would certainly recommend. Plus, Alex and the rest of the team were always on hand to answer any questions that I or anyone else put to them; making my first day at Quince Honey Farm both fun and informative.”   Our Bee a Beekeeper Experience runs every day over the summer at 3pm and 4pm. Speak with our friendly shop staff to book a slot....

Bee bearding & bee baths

Did you know… Bees tend to at least 2,000 flowers daily, with their wings beating 10,000 times per minute and flying approx 15mph?! After the hot weather we have had the bees are feeling the heat too! They are too warm inside the hive so some have clustered around the entrance to cool down. This is called bearding, it is critical that the brood nest doesn’t become overheated. If too many bee bodies are covering the brood on a hot day, fanning may not be sufficient to keep the brood cool. By hanging around on the outside instead of the inside, they decrease the heat load, decrease congestion, and increase the ventilation space.   Even if you can’t keep bees yourself you can still help them by keeping them hydrated. On warm days bees drink an amazing amount of water, so If you would like to help the pollinators in your garden then have a go at creating a bee bath. It’s easy to make and you can sit back and enjoy watching the bees come for a drink in your garden! If you are worried about the bees stinging then be assured that unless they are provoked they don’t want to sting you, they only sting if they feel threatened. The best thing to do if they are near you is to stay calm and don’t flap your arms around – even though this is instinct! 🙂 Get creative to make the perfect bee bath! Making your garden more bee friendly can be more than just planting flowers. You want to attract them with gorgeous blooms, but while...

Do you have a SWARM or a NEST?

Do you have a SWARM or a NEST? Now is the season when bees and wasps become more active, and if you think you have a swarm or a nest on your property, here is some advice… Swarms If you have a honeybee swarm, visit the British Beekeepers Association’s website. Here you can find out information on swarms and, by entering your postcode, find the phone number for the nearest beekeeper who will come and collect it. We can also help with advice if you’re not able to get onto the website. https://www.bbka.org.uk/help/do_you_have_a_swarm.php Why do they swarm? A swarm happens when a colony of bees becomes so large, that a second queen is created and the old queen takes off with half of the colony to establish a new nest. The swarm looks like a swirling mass of bees because the workers are all gathered around the queen to protect her. However, the queen is not a very strong flyer, and so they will often need to rest which is when you might see them on a fence or tree in your garden. When the scout bees find a suitable nest, the swarm will move on, this could happen within a few hours or over a few days. They are very unlikely to sting when swarming. Nests If you think you have a bumblebee nest however, the best thing to do is to leave it alone if it is not causing an inconvenience. Bumblebees are unfortunately a struggling species at the moment, and their nests will only last for one season. We have the contact details for someone who...